Common Questions About Filing Complaints

This list of commonly-asked questions may assist you prior to filing a complaint

When is a real estate agent a REALTOR®?

A real estate agent is a REALTOR® when they become a member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (NAR). The term REALTOR® can only be used by a real estate agent who, through their membership in NAR, subscribes to a strict Code of Ethics.

A real estate agent who is licensed by the Arizona Department of Real Estate may not be a REALTOR® as there is no requirement to join the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® in order to promote or sell real estate.


Transactional Issues

What can my REALTOR® do if the other REALTOR® in a transaction is not communicating with them?

If your REALTOR® has been unsuccessful in their efforts to communicate with another REALTOR®, your REALTOR®’s broker may contact the other REALTOR®’s broker to open the lines of communication.

A broker is a designated REALTOR® who supervises REALTORS®, and has the ultimate responsibility for their agent’s actions.

Can I find out if anyone else placed an offer on the property I want to purchase?

Only with their seller’s approval can REALTORS® disclose the existence of offers on the property.

If a competing offer was accepted on a property I have an offer on, can I find out what the accepted price was?

The information becomes available to the public the day a sale is recorded. You can check with the county in which the sale was recorded for the selling price.

What is dual agency?

When one broker either individually, or two salespeople working for the same broker, represent both the buyer and seller in a real estate transaction.

Why did the seller get my earnest money?

If the funds were being held at a title or escrow company, and the terms of the contract were not met within the provisions of the contract, the title or escrow company made a decision to release the earnest money in accordance to the contract provisions.

AAR offers mediation through the Dispute Resolution System (DRS) between a Seller and a Buyer if one party is disputing the return of an earnest deposit and information may be found at BuyerSellerDisputePkt . You may also consider consulting legal counsel. Attorneys may be located through the State Bar at  http://www.azbar.org

The appliances were at the property when the seller accepted my offer. After close of escrow when I took possession, the appliances were gone.

Contact your REALTOR® to determine if the seller is responsible to replace the appliances. In general, appliances are personal property and as such, must be written into the contract, except built ins or as indicated in lines 30-39, and possibly lines 41-44 of the AAR Residential Resale Purchase Contract, February, 2011, if they are to be part of the purchase of the property.

If the appliances were to be included in the sale of a property, determine if the property was vandalized, you may need to file a police report.

If the appliances were to have remained with the property, and so indicated contractually, the parties may mediate their dispute or consider consulting legal counsel.


Renting, Lease and Property Management Issues

A copy of the Arizona Landlord & Tenant Act may be found at: Arizona Landlord Tenant Act

Who is responsible to refund my security deposits?

The executed lease agreement indicates if a property management firm has control over the deposits or the landlord personally.  The responsible party indicated in the lease, is therefore the person to contact regarding any possible refunds. Referencing the AAR Residential Lease Agreement, February 2008, lines 59-81, addresses deposits and refunds.

Why is my cleaning or security deposit refund less than what I paid?

If the lease agreement provided for carpets to be cleaned by the tenant at lease termination, as an example, and the tenant moved out without having the carpets cleaned, the property manager or landlord may withhold money to have the service performed in accordance with the lease agreement. Certain deposits are indicated as refundable on your lease agreement while other deposits are indicated as non-refundable, for instance a pet deposit. The AAR Residential Lease Agreement, February 2008, lines 59-69 sets forth refundable and non-refundable deposits.


Complaints: Real Estate Agent Issues

I want to file a complaint because the REALTOR® 1) won’t return my phone calls, 2) is rude when speaking to me, and/or 3) won’t answer my questions.

These three issues may not directly relate to the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Code of Ethics (Code). The Arizona Association of REALTORS® may still be able to assist you. Consider allowing a REALTOR® Ombudsman to contact you and perhaps the REALTOR® to try and open the door to communication. A REALTOR® Ombudsman may also describe customary practices to help you better understand a real estate transaction.

Stop for a minute. Think about the relationship to see if there is a failure to perform as described in the Code.  If you notice the Code actually relates to the REALTORS® failure to perform, consider filing for mediation or filing a formal complaint.

A copy of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Code of Ethics may be found at:  REALTOR® Code of Ethics

What is the difference between the Arizona Association of REALTORS® function and that of the Arizona Department of Real Estate?

You may use the “Find A REALTOR®” at the Arizona Association of REALTORS® (AAR) website:  AAR Website. AAR reviews and considers a member’s behavior (ethics) to determine if there is a violation to the REALTOR® Code of Ethics.

The Arizona Department of Real Estate is a State of Arizona regulatory agency which issues licenses to real estate brokers and salespeople and investigates violations of Arizona real estate law (statutes and Commissioner’s Rules). They may be contacted at:  Arizona Department of Real Estate

Dispute Resolution Services

The Arizona Association of REALTORS® Resolve Disputes

  • Ombudsman assistance – Ethics Complaints – Mediation Requests
    • REALTOR®/client
    • REALTOR®/REALTOR®
  • Commission disputes between REALTORS®
  • Buyer Seller Dispute Resolution

Better Business Bureau

  • Attempts to resolved disputes between members and their customers www.bbb.org

Civil Rights/Consumer Protection

Criminal actions (trespassing, assault, theft, etc.)

  • Contact your local law enforcement agency.

Financial Concerns

  • Small Claims, Civil, or Superior Courts
  • The Arizona Department of Financial Institutions regulates Escrow and Mortgage Companies inArizona including loan and interest rate issues. http://azdfi.gov/

Home Owner Association Issues

Insurance

Construction/Contractor Issues

  • The Arizona Registrar of Contractors has jurisdiction concerning construction defects. http://www.azroc.gov/

The REALTOR® Commitment to a Market Free of Discrimination

Reviewed May 2016

Over 100 years ago, in furtherance of its commitment to business integrity and fair dealing, the National Association of Realtors® (NAR) adopted its Code of Ethics. The Code of Ethics defines, guides, and regulates the professional conduct of Realtors® and demonstrates REALTORS’® level of commitment, emphasis on education and dedication to their profession. The Arizona Association of REALTORS® (AAR) is responsible for enforcing the Code of Ethics.

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Among the core principles of the code is a promise to provide equal professional service to all clients and customers. Article 10 of the Code of Ethics therefore prohibits Realtors® from discriminating practices and requires that equal professional services be provided to all individuals as part of a Realtor’s® commitment to fair housing.

Because NAR firmly believes in equal opportunities in housing, in November 2010, NAR’s Board of Directors passed an amendment to  Article 10 of the Code of Ethics prohibiting members from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. While the inclusion of sexual orientation was intended to be all-encompassing, NAR ultimately decided to add “gender identity” as a definitional clarification. Effective January 2014, Article 10 of the Code of Ethics therefore reads as follows:

Realtors® shall not deny equal professional services to any person for reasons of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or gender identity.  Realtors® shall not be parties to any plan or agreement to discriminate against a person or persons on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation or gender identity. (Amended 1/14)

Realtors®, in their real estate employment practices, shall not discriminate against any person or persons on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or gender identity.  (Amended 1/14)

Moreover, Standard of Practice 10-3 was amended as follows:

Realtors® shall not print, display or circulate any statement or advertisement with respect to selling or renting of a property that indicates any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin sexual orientation, or gender identity. (Adopted 1/94, Renumbered 1/05 and 1/06, Amended 1/14)

The 2014 amendment to Article 10 therefore not only reaffirms NAR’s and AAR’s commitment to fair housing, it is also a reflection of our collective commitment to a market free of discrimination.


Fair Housing Resources from NAR

April 2014 marks the 46th anniversary of the 1968 landmark Fair Housing Act. Each year REALTORS® recognize the significance of this event and reconfirm our commitment to upholding fair housing law as well as our commitment to offering equal professional service to all in their search for real property.

Resources can be found here: http://www.realtor.org/programs/fair-housing-program

Following the Pathways to Professionalism

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Code Talk: Wrap-Up

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Prospecting? Avoid These Danger Zones

Editor’s Note: The Code of Ethics turns 100 in 2013. AAR will be celebrating the code with monthly articles published under the caption, Code Talk, in the Arizona REALTOR® Magazine, discussing the various ways the code governs professional conduct and interaction with the consumer in every day transactions.

When it comes to obtaining new clients, real estate agents are at the top of their game. But, there are several commonly used prospecting tactics that can land agents in hot water. This month, we’ll take a look at some danger zones to avoid when it comes to prospecting and advertising and give you tips on the right and wrong ways to do it.

Zone 1: Giving It Away 

While prospecting for new clients, some agents consider using a game of chance (like a drawing for an iPad).  However, agents should make certain that they are not doing so in violation of Arizona law.  A.R.S. § 13-3301(4) defines gambling, in part, as “the act of risking or giving something of value for the opportunity to obtain a benefit from a game or contest of chance or skill.”  Giving business to an agent in exchange for entry into a drawing is likely considered “giving something of value for the opportunity to obtain a benefit.” Agents should therefore refrain from offering new clients entry into a game of chance in exchange for business.

In light of the above, the better practice is to offer the same benefit to all members of the public that attend the agent’s open house or respond to the agent’s advertisement. Jerome King, designated broker of Long Realty in Tucson, Ariz., offers this advice for erring on the side of caution, “If you’d like to offer a free Starbuck’s card at an open house, you should give a Starbuck’s card to everyone.” The giveaways must be without condition and universal across the board. Furthermore, keep in mind that Article 12, Standard of Practice 12-1 of the code of ethics states: “REALTORS® may use the term ‘free’ and similar terms in their advertising and in other representations provided that all terms governing availability of the offered product or service are clearly disclosed at the same time.”

Zone 2: The Claim Game 

“I’ve seen a lot of marketing attempts lately that focus on ‘the last five homes sold in this neighborhood’. And then it gives the addresses of five homes sold, but not necessarily the last five homes the agent himself sold,” said King. “It’s a great marketing tactic, but it has one flaw: If you weren’t involved in the transaction you can’t give the impression in your advertising that you sold these homes.” Article 12, Standard of Practice 12-7 states: “Only REALTORS® who participated in the transaction as the listing broker or cooperating broker (selling broker) may claim to have “sold” the property.” Armando Contla, GRI with Arizona Turquoise Realty in Lake Havasu City, Ariz. adds, “I’ve also seen people advertise a property that has already closed escrow” in an effort to gain prospective clients. This is also found when people ‘poach’ listings and post them to Craigslist or other internet sites.

If you’re looking to paint a picture of a specific neighborhood in your marketing collateral, you should leverage other data such as that on your MLS or from your local newspaper.

 Zone 3: Slippery Signs 

“Many REALTORS® are posting ‘For Sale’ or ‘For Lease’ signs in their own yards to gain the attention of potential buyers. The only problem is, the agent’s home isn’t really on the market. This is just a way to get prospects,” said King. Clever? Sure. Unethical? Definitely. Article 12 of the code of ethics strictly prohibits false advertising of any kind. King offers this solution, “If you want to post a sign in your yard attracting new clients, have it say something like ‘For information regarding real estate in this neighborhood, call …’.”

Contla said that he’s also seen For Sale By Owner (FSBO) signs popping up in agents’ yards, when the property is not for sale. “Appealing to unrepresented buyers with a FSBO sign is just another bait and switch tactic.”
Along those same lines, Contla says that many agents are putting “For Sale” signs in front of homes where the owner may not want it advertised. “We’re seeing this in rental properties where the owner may live out of state,” said Contla. “Agents think that a home won’t sell unless it has a ‘For Sale’ sign in front. But, you must make sure that you have the express consent of your owner to do so.”

 

Code Talk: Avoid These Common Code of Ethics Violations

Editor’s Note: The Code of Ethics turns 100 in 2013. AAR will be celebrating the code with monthly articles published under the caption, Code Talk, in the Arizona REALTOR® Magazine, discussing the various ways the code governs professional conduct and interaction with the consumer in every day transactions.

To date, AAR has received 42 ethics violation complaints this year. That’s a slight decrease from the 46 we had last year at this time, but we can do better. This month, AAR would like to share with you some common violations we’re seeing this year, along with ways to avoid them.

1.  Verbal Counter Offers. “We’re seeing a rise in offers being verbally countered,” said Jan Steward, manger, risk management, Arizona Association of REALTORS®. “Not putting contract terms in writing is a risky practice.” And, it could end up becoming a Code of Ethics violation. Article 9 of the Code of Ethics, Standard of Practice 9-1 states: “For the protection of all parties, REALTORS® shall use reasonable care to ensure that documents pertaining to the purchase, sale, or lease of real estate are kept current through the use of written extensions or amendments.”

Trudy Moore, designated broker with HomeSmart said, “The problem with verbal counteroffers is that they usually occur when there are multiple offers.” The seller’s agent may tell Agent A that their client will accept one price and then Agent B submits another offer at a higher price.

Marge Lindsay, director of training and associate broker with West USA Realty, Inc., adds that verbal counteroffers can catch clients off-guard especially when they think that because the offer has been accepted verbally it’s official. “Clients are emotionally involved in the transaction and truly believe when a verbal counter offer is accepted, it’s a done deal.”  When that turns out not to be the case, the client may seek to blame their agent for inadequately protecting their interests. Lindsay therefore counsels her students to inform clients that “noting can be enforced until it’s in writing.”

2.  Pre-Possession without Written Consent. “We’re seeing a rise in buyers’ agents giving their buyers the keys prior to close of escrow and without a written contract,” said Steward. This is not only a liability issue, since the seller is responsible for the home and all who occupy it prior to close of escrow, but also an ethics violation. Article 3, Standard of Practice 3-9 states: “REALTORS® shall not provide access to listed property on terms other than those established by the owner of the listing broker.” 

Marge Lindsay adds, “We added provisions for this into the contract because of the many legal issues that come up as a result. The comment I make to my students is: Don’t let this recommendation [to get keys early] come out of your mouth.” REALTORS® need to understand the liability they are exposing themselves to. “Ask you broker to share a few horror stories about this. You’ll see how bad things can get.”

3.  Agents Not Presenting All Offers. Trudy Moore said, “Agents must present all offers. Recently, I’ve seen listing agents get 15 offers and only present the one that they think is the best deal for their client.” And while agents might have their client’s best interests in mind, not presenting all offers is grounds for violation.  Furthermore, it is up to the seller, not their agent, to decide which offer is best. Article 1, Standard of Practice 1-6 states: “REALTORS® shall submit offers and counter-offers objectively and as quickly as possible.”  Equally important is Article 1, Standard of Practice 1-7, which requires REALTORS® to “submit to the seller/landlord all offers and counter-offers until closing or execution of a lease unless the seller/landlord has waived this obligation writing.”  You must therefore be certain to present all purchase offers up until close of escrow unless you have written instructions from your principal waiving this requirement.

AAR is here to help you resolve disputes

If you’re experiencing any of these issues, talk to your broker and get his advice.

AAR offers its members many benefits, one of which is assistance with dispute resolution. When dealing with money, things can get heated. Depending on the allegation or offense, AAR offers various processes to resolve disputes for members statewide, with the exception of the Southeast Valley Regional Association of REALTORS® (SEVRAR). If your dispute is with a SEVRAR member, contact their association at 480-833-7510 for assistance.

Read previous Code Talk articles:

The C.O.E Bells Ring During the First Phone Call

The Ethics of Property Management

Disclose Early and Often

Listing Agreements

The Case for Buyer-Broker Agreements

Five Tips for Adhering to Article 12

Fair Housing

 

Code Talk:The Ethics of Property Management

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Code Talk: Disclose Early and Often

Editor’s Note: The Code of Ethics turns 100 in 2013. AAR will be celebrating the code with monthly articles published under the caption, Code Talk, in the Arizona REALTOR® Magazine, discussing the various ways the code governs professional conduct and interaction with the consumer in every day transactions. 

Article 2 of the National Association of REALTORS® Code of Ethics states: “REALTORS® shall avoid exaggeration, misrepresentation, or concealment of pertinent facts relating to the property or the transaction.”

This seems straightforward enough. But with disclosure, come gray areas. Take the following NAR case interpretation:

Seller A came to REALTOR® B’s office explaining that his company was transferring him to another city and he wished to sell his home. In executing the listing contract, Seller A specified that the house had hardwood floors throughout and that the selling price would include the shutters and draperies that had been custom made for the house. Seller A said that he would like to continue to occupy the house for 90 days while his wife looked for another home at his new location, and agreed that REALTOR® B could show the house during this time without making a special appointment for each visit. Accordingly, REALTOR® B advertised the house, showed it to a number of prospective buyers, and obtained a purchase contract from Buyer C. Settlement was completed and at the expiration of the 90-day period from the date of listing, Seller A moved out and Buyer C moved in.

On the day that Buyer C moved in, seeing the house for the first time in its unfurnished condition, he quickly observed that hardwood flooring existed only on the outer rim of the floor in each room that had been visible beyond the edges of rugs when he inspected the house, and that the areas that had been previously covered by rugs in each room were of subflooring material. He complained that REALTOR® B, the listing broker, had misrepresented the house in his advertisements and in the description included in his listing form which had specified “hardwood floors throughout.” Buyer C complained to REALTOR® B, who immediately contacted Seller A. REALTOR® B pointed out that the house had been fully furnished when it was listed and Seller A had said that the house had hardwood floors throughout. Seller A acknowledged that he had so described the floors, but said the error was inadvertent since he had lived in the house for 10 years since it had been custom built for him. He explained that in discussing the plans and specifications with the contractor who had built the house, the contractor had pointed out various methods of reducing construction costs, including limiting the use of hardwood flooring to the outer rim of each room’s floor. Since Seller A had planned to use rugs in each room, he had agreed, and after 10 years of living in the house with the sub-flooring covered by rugs, he had “simply forgotten about it.”

REALTOR® B explained, however, that Seller A’s description, which he had accepted, had resulted in misrepresentation to the buyer. “But it’s a small point,” said Seller A. “He’ll probably use rugs too, so it really doesn’t make any difference.” After further pressure from REALTOR® B for some kind of adjustment for Buyer C, Seller A concluded, “It was an honest mistake. It’s not important. I’m not going to do anything about it. If Buyer C thinks this is a serious matter, let him sue me.”

REALTOR® B explained Seller A’s attitude to Buyer C, saying that he regretted it very much, but under the circumstances could do nothing more about it. It was at this point that Buyer C filed a complaint with REALTOR® B’s Board.

At the hearing before a Hearing Panel of the Professional Standards Committee of REALTOR® B’s Board, during which all of these facts were brought out, the panel found that REALTOR® B had acted in good faith in accepting Seller A’s description of the property. While Article 2 prohibits concealment of pertinent facts, exaggeration, and misrepresentation, REALTOR® B had faithfully represented to Buyer C information given to him by Seller A. There were no obvious reasons to suspect that hardwood floors were not present throughout as Seller A had advised. REALTOR® B was found not in violation of Article 2.

Case #2-3: Obligation to Disclose Defects | (Revised Case #9-9 May, 1988. Transferred to Article 2 November, 1994)

Advice from the Pros 

Echoing the example above, Frank Dickens, SRES, ABR, CRMS, a REALTOR® with Realty ONE Group in Phoenix offers a warning: “Agents can innocently get caught up in a lack of disclosure.” But, Dickens offers some sage advice, “You must encourage your seller to go deeper. Even the most minor repair can become a huge issue to a buyer that is disgruntled.” Dickens uses an example of a home with a newly- added roof. While nothing is wrong with the new roof per se, there must’ve been a reason for a new roof to be added. Ask your clients why they chose to make upgrades to the house and you’ll soon get the whole story. Much like a well-documented used car, Dickens says that buyers aren’t looking for a perfect house; they are looking for an honest seller.

When he encounters a seller that may be hesitant to disclose something, Dickens is straightforward with his clients saying, “I have a fiduciary obligation to sell your home for the most amount of money and the least amount of liability.” Dickens takes his job as an advisor seriously and helps his clients understand the ramifications of not disclosing. “In the lawsuits I’ve seen, typically the buyer is suing the seller’s agent. These cases go on for years and years. If you want to make sure that you’re protecting yourself and your clients, you have to get them to disclose and document everything.”

Disclosure Forms From Arizona Association of REALTORS®

When it comes to disclosure, agents should encourage their sellers to use the Seller Property Disclosure Statement (SPDS) form and be as thorough as possible. (Note: If you are using the AAR Residential Resale Real Estate Contract, you are contractually obligated to deliver a completed SPDS to the buyer within five days after contract acceptance.) This form allows the seller to list all known issues about the property. It is also a great way for sellers to identify any repairs made to the property. A sample of the SPDS is available here. AAR also provides a Vacant Land/Lot Seller SPDS.

A Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange (CLUE) is a report from the seller providing a five-year insurance claim/inquiry history for a specific property address. More information on using CLUE Reports is here.

Tips for Buyers 

The AAR Buyer Advisory was created to help buyers identify some of the more common issues that a buyer should investigate and verify concerning a property purchase. Included is a list of:

  1. Common documents a buyer should review;
  2. Physical conditions in the property the buyer should investigate; and
  3. Conditions affecting the surrounding area that the buyer should investigate.

To receive automatic updates to the Buyer Advisory, sign up for the email feed. The Buyer Advisory is also available in Spanish.

 

Code Talk: Fair Housing

Editor’s Note: The Code of Ethics turns 100 in 2013. AAR will be celebrating the code with monthly articles published under the caption, Code Talk, in the Arizona REALTOR® Magazine, discussing the various ways the code governs professional conduct and interaction with the consumer in every day transactions. 

April 2013 marks the 45th anniversary of the 1968 landmark Fair Housing Act. Each year, REALTORS® recognize the significance of this event and reconfirm our commitment to upholding fair housing laws as well as our commitment to offering equal professional service to all in their search for real property.

If you have not read the Fair Housing Declaration in a while, I encourage you to do so.

Every real estate licensee in Arizona is required to take a minimum of three hours of continuing education in Fair Housing each renewal period, so you are already well versed in Fair Housing issues. What can AAR impart to our members regarding their duty to offer equal services to all and thereby provide consumers with equal opportunity in housing? Article 10 states:

REALTORS® shall not deny equal professional services to any person for reasons of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, or sexual orientation. REALTORS® shall not be parties to any plan or agreement to discriminate against a person or persons on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, or sexual orientation (Amended 1/11).

You are therefore reminded that regardless of your client’s race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin or sexual orientation they are entitled to the same level of care and service that you take pride in offering.

In the March Code Talk column, members discussed the mechanics of listing agreements, ancillary forms for listings, MLS dissemination and advertising through the Internet as it pertains to the Code of Ethics. Standard operating procedure (SOP) 10-3 relates to listings, as well stating:  “REALTORS® shall not print, display or circulate any statement or advertisement with respect to selling or renting of a property that indicates any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, or sexual orientation,” (Adopted 1/94, Renumbered 1/05 and 1/06, Amended 1/11). 

Mary Lee Greason, a Tucson REALTOR® and Fair Housing educator, offered some sage words of advice: “In advertising our listings, we need to remember the advice I heard years ago from an attorney [who] prosecuted Fair Housing violations, ‘Stick to the amenities of the property and not the people who might live there!’”

The Department of Housing and Urban Development recently shared two scenarios which may constitute housing discrimination:

  • A gay man is evicted because his landlord believes he will infect other tenants with HIV/AIDS.  That situation may constitute illegal disability discrimination under the Fair Housing Act because the man is perceived to have a disability, HIV/AIDS.
  • A property manager refuses to rent an apartment to a prospective tenant who is transgender.  If the housing denial is because of the prospective tenant’s non-conformity with gender stereotypes, it may constitute illegal discrimination on the basis of sex under the Fair Housing Act.

Finally, a reminder that Article 10 and SOP 10-4 extends discrimination to cover employment in real estate offices:  As used in Article 10, “real estate employment practices” relates to employees and independent contractors providing real estate-related services and the administrative and clerical staff directly supporting those individuals. (Adopted 1/00, Renumbered 1/05 and 1/06). 

I would like to leave you with the following from the National Association of REALTORS®:

As REALTORS®, our success isn’t measured by the bottom line. It’s measured by the trust of our clients and customers and the esteem in which we’re held by our colleagues and competitors. The National Association was founded with the goal of uniting the real estate profession through high standards to protect buyers and sellers. 100 years after its adoption, the Code of Ethics continues to be what sets us apart as REALTORS®.

About the author:

Jan Steward brings a wealth of experience to the Arizona Association of REALTORS® as the Risk Management Specialist. She is a former title company manager and escrow officer with paralegal training. As a REALTOR® and broker, Jan served the Northern Arizona Association of REALTORS® (NAAR) as board president, vice-president, director, MLS chair, delegate to NAR’s national convention and a member of the Professional Standards and Grievance Committees. Jan was honored as REALTOR® of the Year by NAAR. She also has served on AAR’s Professional Standards Committee and a variety of ad hoc committees.

Professional Standards Statistics

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