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Bullhead City/Mohave Valley

Tax reform town hall planned

BY TSN

MOHAVE COUNTY – Mohave County officials continue to measure public support for a proposal to reduce the primary property tax, but collect roughly the same amount of revenue by increasing the sales tax by one quarter cent. Supervisors Jean Bishop and Travis Lingenfelter invite interested citizens to a Wednesday town hall that will provide information and opportunity to pose questions.

Adoption of the tax reform package requires unanimous support from the five-member board.

County Finance Director Coral Loyd and Assessor Jeanne Kentch will be on hand for the town hall in the Board of Supervisors Auditorium in the Administration building on Beale St. It starts at 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.

Dave Hawkins

Central Arizona

Green Valley/Sahuarita

Kingman

Tax reform town hall planned

BY TSN

MOHAVE COUNTY – Mohave County officials continue to measure public support for a proposal to reduce the primary property tax, but collect roughly the same amount of revenue by increasing the sales tax by one quarter cent. Supervisors Jean Bishop and Travis Lingenfelter invite interested citizens to a Wednesday town hall that will provide information and opportunity to pose questions.

Adoption of the tax reform package requires unanimous support from the five-member board.

County Finance Director Coral Loyd and Assessor Jeanne Kentch will be on hand for the town hall in the Board of Supervisors Auditorium in the Administration building on Beale St. It starts at 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.

Dave Hawkins

Lake Havasu

Tax reform town hall planned

BY TSN

MOHAVE COUNTY – Mohave County officials continue to measure public support for a proposal to reduce the primary property tax, but collect roughly the same amount of revenue by increasing the sales tax by one quarter cent. Supervisors Jean Bishop and Travis Lingenfelter invite interested citizens to a Wednesday town hall that will provide information and opportunity to pose questions.

Adoption of the tax reform package requires unanimous support from the five-member board.

County Finance Director Coral Loyd and Assessor Jeanne Kentch will be on hand for the town hall in the Board of Supervisors Auditorium in the Administration building on Beale St. It starts at 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.

Dave Hawkins

Northern Arizona

Coconino County moves to increase primary/secondary property taxes

  • DAILY SUN STAFF

Coconino County is looking to increase levies for both the primary and secondary property taxes.

In addition to supporting general expenses, the tax increases are meant to support a variety of funds including the County Public Health Service, the Library District and the Flood Control District.

All of the proposed increases will impact only property taxes received from new construction.

The Coconino County Board of Supervisors is set to discuss and potentially approve the levy increases during a 5 p.m. virtual meeting planned for Thursday, June 24.

Coconino County is proposing an increase in primary property taxes of $205,163, or 2.0%.

Should the increase pass, the county’s primary property taxes on a $100,000 home would be $51.80. Currently, the taxes levied on that $100,000 home would be $50.78.

In terms of the secondary property tax, the Health Services District, Library District and Flood Control districts are all looking to increase their tax levies.

The County Public Health Services District is proposing an increase in secondary property taxes of $205,164, or 4.25%.

The proposed increase would mean the secondary property tax to support the health district on a $100,000 home would be $25. Without the proposed tax increase, the total taxes that would be owed on a $100,000 home would be $23.98.

The Coconino County Flood Control District is proposing an increase in secondary property taxes of $815,138 or 21.13%.

The proposed tax increase would cause Coconino County Flood Control District’s secondary property taxes on a $100,000 home to be $26.20. Currently, the total taxes that would be owed on a $100,000 home would be $21.63.

Lastly, the Coconino County Library District is proposing an increase in secondary property taxes of $209,187, or 4.24%.

That proposed tax increase would cause Coconino County Library District’s secondary property taxes on a $100,000 home to be $25.56. At the moment, the total taxes that would be owed on a $100,000 home would be $24.52.

Residents interested in weighing in on the proposed increases can take part in the June 24 meeting either through Zoom or by calling. To take part in the Zoom conference, go to https://zoom.us/j/91901866999. Residents can call in by dialing (833) 548-0276. The webinar ID is 919 0186 6999.

The increases come as the board is also moving forward with the county’s fiscal year 22 budget that was tentatively passed last week.

Coconino County Finance Director Siri Mullaney told the Arizona Daily Sun last week that the budget tentatively passed by the board was essentially identical to the budget approved last year at the height of the pandemic.

However, the FY22 budget did include a much higher ceiling on how much money the county could be allowed to spend. That will let the county use federal dollars and COVID relief it has received from the American Rescue Plan, or could still receive from further congressional efforts.

Phoenix

Prescott Area

Sedona Verde Valley

SEVRAR

Board clears development of historic Mesa site

  • By Tom Scanlon Tribune Managing Editor

At 150 years old, the Crimson Farmstead is about as close to ancient as Mesa gets.

Not for long, though.

On June 1, the Mesa Historic Preservation Governing Board approved lifting historic overlay status, clearing the way for the Homestead at Lehi Crossing. The proposed 262-unit, four-story multi-family residential development on approximately 9 acres is at the southeast corner of Gilbert and McDowell Roads.

Today, it’s just a barren sliver of a bustling city, a sunken chunk of land surrounded by busy thoroughfares.

But in 1870, it was a very different story …  The four “founding fathers of Mesa” are Charles Crismon, Frances Pomeroy, Charles Robson and George W. Sirrine; they are memorialized in a statue at Pioneer Park.

The Crismon family homestead (home and farm) was in the family for three generations.

“At the time that the Loop 202/Red Mountain Freeway was being designed, the Crismons applied for and received the historic overlay for the property through the city of Mesa in 2001, and the design of the freeway accommodated their property,” noted a presentation to the Historic Preservation Board.

The property was later sold to the city and the historic-but-dilapidated buildings were moved in 2006.

The city later sold the property to a private owner, but the historic overlay status remained until it will be formally removed.

Arianna Urban, a city planner, told the board that “the site itself is below grade …

“There’s not a whole lot to see there at this point.”

She said the second big Mesa

pioneer settlement “was traditionally a

farming property and remained so for many years.”

The location is now pegged for a

high-end neighborhood — which, the developer insists, will give a strong nod to the past.

“We are not a team of developers that are going to ignore the history,” Ben Graff, an attorney representing Sweetwater Properties, said.

“In fact, we’re going to embrace the history.”

According to Sweetwater Properties’ presentation, “Although the Crismon Farm Homestead no longer exists, the development proposes a number of items that will serve to acknowledge, honor, protect and reflect the cherished heritage of the Crismon family and historic significance of the property.”

The developer promises to “create a blend of the simple lines prevalent in early farm home design reminiscent of Mesa’s heritage, such as those used with the former Crismon Farm homestead, along with the careful selection of both traditional and contemporary materials. We have utilized a robust blend of board and batten, stucco and stone to create an articulation of mass, color, texture and light into our Contemporary Farmhouse concept.” 

Sweetwater says a cafe to be called the Crismon Soda Shop will honor the historic family.

“We envision members of the Mesa community stopping to hydrate and enjoy a meal as they wrap up a morning walk or horseback ride along the Sunset Trail, which is adjacent to the SRP canal system in this area,” said the presentation.

“The trail system was important to the Crismon family, is an important community amenity and the development will serve to enhance the trail experience with new landscaping just north of the trail.”

Sweetwater Properties pledged “to collect and display historic photographs of the original Homestead structures and other significant moments of historic significance in the cafe.”

The board thought that was a nice start, but also is requiring the developer to place a plaque or “more permanent fixture” that denotes the historic nature. ′

Tucson

WEMAR

Landsea Homes buys 247 lots at Bentridge in Buckeye

AZRE

Landsea Homes Corporation, a publicly traded residential homebuilder, announced today that it has closed on 247 homesites at Bentridge, located in the heart of Buckeye, Arizona.  

“Bentridge is an exciting opportunity for first time home buyers who are looking for thoughtfully designed homes at attainable price points,” said Kaylee Smith, Arizona Division President, Landsea Homes. “We’re also pleased to provide a second collection of larger square footage plans with enhanced livability that will serve a growing demand in the Buckeye market. Our wildly successful Sundance community is nearby and with only a few homes remaining, this acquisition is a great opportunity to continue our presence within a community that we really enjoy.”

This community of 247 homes will feature options for single-level and two-story living, as well as indoor-outdoor living options, spacious design elements, and 14 different floorplans. The community preserves over 30 acres of open space, including a community park. Prices have not yet been published.

Bentridge is conveniently located near Sundance Park and just minutes from the scenic White Tank Mountains. Residents will have ample entertainment options with hiking and biking trails at the spectacular Skyline Regional Park, and live within close proximity to nearby entertainment districts, and major sporting events at State Farm Stadium, Gila River Arena, and more. 

Construction is slated to begin in 2022, with sales expected to commence in fall 2022.

This news comes on the heels of another recent announcement that Landsea Homes acquired 193 additional homesites at North Copper Canyon in Surprise, Arizona, as the public homebuilder remains one of the largest in the state.  

For more information about Landsea Homes, visit http://www.landseahomes.com.

White Mountain

Annual citywide slurry seal project to last three weeks

Residents may have noticed the city of Show Low has begun its annual citywide slurry seal project.

Crews began work yesterday and will continue through Monday, June 28.

Color-coded maps and schedules are available for viewing on showlowaz.gov to learn which streets will be impacted. Not not all roads will be impacted.

The completion timeframe is subject to change depending on weather and other unforeseen project changes.

Please check back often for progress updates progress. Patience is appreciated as crews tend to important road upkeep.

Yuma

County to address stormwater runoff in Gadsden-San Luis area

Following the recommendation of a drainage study, Yuma County went with the least expensive alternative, at a cost of $19.13 million, to address stormwater runoff for the area between Gadsden and San Luis.

The Board of Supervisors approved the final design of the Gadsden-San Luis Outfall and Basin Discharge Project as recommended by the consulting firm Ritoch-Powell and Associates. The county’s Department of Engineering contracted the firm to review previous drainage reports for the Yuma Valley and prepare a new drainage study and design plans for the area between Gadsden and the City of San Luis. This area is about 10.5 square miles.

The drainage study addressed the stormwater that exceeds the 100-year, 24-hour storm. This is the level of storm event required for all new developments, which must design projects to accommodate stormwater within their own property, according to a staff report.

The primary purpose of the project is to provide relief for the stormwater runoff trapped in the area bounded by County 18th Street on the north, Avenue H on the east, County 22nd Street on the south, West Canal and Colorado River on the west.

The area needs a stormwater collection system so properties developed in the future can connect to it, the staff report noted.

To address this additional stormwater runoff, the consultant designed a series of detention basins with outfalls and pump stations for their discharge into the Yuma Valley’s drain system. The consultant proposed two alternatives. Alternative 1 uses a series of open ditches or channels within the project area to collect stormwater and meter it out into the drain system. This alternative would cost about $19.13 million, including construction and land acquisition costs.

Alternative 2 uses storm drain pipelines to carry the stormwater at a cost of $29.8 million, including construction and land acquisition costs.

The consultant and staff recommended Alternative 1 because it’s the least costly, less labor intensive and simple to construct. They also noted that the construction excavation material from detention ponds and open channels can be used elsewhere in other projects or could be sold to potential construction contractors generating revenue leading to some cost savings.

In addition, this alternative would be easier to maintain compared with an underground pipe system, which may get clogged with debris and require frequent maintenance. This alternative also has less utility conflicts compared to a pipe system, which also has the potential to get crushed if it’s not compacted, backfilled and constructed properly under a road crossing.

The consultant and staff also pointed out that the lead time for procuring pipes from the manufacturer may vary, which could have a negative impact on the project schedule and budget.

Lastly, they noted that underground soil conditions can make the pipe installation difficult and complicated which may result in additional construction costs.

The supervisors selected the first alternative and authorized staff to negotiate the final design contract and proceed with the final design.

Funding for design had been scheduled for fiscal year 2023/24. However, staff indicated that it might be able to move the project schedule up.

In other action, the supervisors approved the Yuma County Water Users Association estimated cost of $66,770 for the reconstruction of the drain crossing at County 11th Street and Avenue F½.

Due to the deteriorated condition of the drain crossing, the YCWUA temporarily repaired a portion of the collapsed corrugated metal pipe of this crossing that is just south of the roadway. However, due to its condition, the entire pipeline needs to be replaced. Consequently, the Department of Engineering programmed this crossing to be replaced in fiscal year 2021/22.

Yuma County requested a cost proposal from the YCWUA to see if they would like to participate and reconstruct the old drain culvert crossing. The association submitted a cost proposal in the amount of $66,770 to supply, install and construct the concrete pipeline and headwalls for this crossing.

The county noted that the cost is for the pipeline within its road right-of-way. The YCWUA will pay for the pipeline replacement that is outside the county right-of-way.

To keep costs down, Yuma County Public Works will assist the YCWUA with the traffic control set-up and maintenance, final field grading and roadway replacement. The YCWUA has scheduled the replacement construction of the culvert for July.